Nichole Kycia PA-C

Currently affiliated with Ellington Pediatrics

860-870-8841

38 West Rd
 Ellington , CT 06029

Our Location


Currently affiliated with Ellington Pediatrics
38 West Rd
Ellington , Connecticut 06029
Phone: 860-870-8841

Patient Education

Nichole Kycia would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Nichole Kycia provides a full range of medical services including the following:


ADHD in Children

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic condition that affects children, with symptoms often continuing into adulthood. Common symptoms of ADHD include inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. ADHD affects the behavior of children both at home and in school. According to the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately eleven percent of children in the United States are diagnosed with ADHD. Boys are more commonly diagnosed with this condition than girls. Children with ADHD often struggle in school, have poor self-esteem and may be at an increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse as they get older. With treatment, however, most people with ADHD can lead successful and productive lives. ...


Read More...

Asthma

Asthma is a condition in which the lungs and air passages become inflamed and constricted, interfering with normal breathing. During the first stage of an asthmatic response, inhaled allergens or other irritants cause the airways to constrict. During the second stage, an inflammatory response causes the airways to swell, and fill with thickened, sticky mucus. During an attack, patients have increasing difficulty in breathing, and usually make the wheezing sound typically associated with asthma. Although life-threatening, asthma can usually be well-controlled with medication. ...


Read More...

Autism

Autism, or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), encompasses a range of pervasive developmental disorders. These disorders vary in degree from mild forms like Asperger's syndrome to severe impairment.

Autism is characterized by difficulties with communication and social interaction and by repetitive behavior patterns. The disorder has become very common, occurring in more than 1 percent of children. Autism is four times more likely to occur in males. Besides Asperger's syndrome, there are several other types of ASD, including pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, childhood disintegrative disorder, and Rett's syndrome. ...


Read More...

Bronchitis

Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, which carry air in and out of the lungs during respiration. There are two types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Acute bronchitis is common, occurring frequently as a complication of a cold or other respiratory infection. Chronic bronchitis, however, is less common and more serious. A person is considered to have the chronic form when the bronchitis lasts longer, up to several months, and occurs more frequently, two or more times a year. Chronic bronchitis may be a precursor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ...


Read More...

Chickenpox

Chickenpox, caused by the varicella-zoster virus, is a highly contagious childhood disease which causes a red, itchy rash of small blisters all over the body. The rash typically first appears on the trunk and then spreads to the face and limbs. The illness can be serious in babies, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems. Previously considered an inevitable childhood disease, the illness is now far less common since a chickenpox vaccine has been developed and is normally administered to all young children. With very few exceptions, children in the United States must be vaccinated against chicken pox before registering to attend day care or school. Most frequently, children have been given their second and final dose of chickenpox vaccine by the time they are 6 years old, but if necessary they can be vaccinated later on. ...


Read More...

Childhood Obesity

Children between the ages of 2 to 19 years are diagnosed as obese when their body mass index, or BMI is greater than or equal to the 95th percentile. The body mass index takes into consideration both height and weight and while it is not a perfect measurement, it is a good indicator of body fat. Children will tend to have different amounts of body fat at different points in time, especially during growth periods, and the healthy range for BMI will vary based on age and gender. Children who are obese have too much body fat according to the BMI index and are at a weight that is greater than what is considered healthy for their height. ...


Read More...

The Common Cold

A common cold is a viral infection that affects the upper respiratory tract. The common cold also affects the nose and throat and may be caused by different viruses. Symptoms of the common cold normally last about one week but may last longer in children, the elderly, and in individuals with other underlying conditions or illnesses. The common cold is one of the main reasons people visit the doctor each year. ...


Read More...

Concussion

A concussion is a common type of brain injury most often caused by a direct blow to the head or sudden head movement that causes temporary brain malfunction. When the head is hit unexpectedly, the brain can move and hit the skull, affecting memory, judgment, reflexes, speech, balance and coordination. A concussion may also be caused by a sports related injury, a motor vehicle accident or from being violently shaken. Most concussions are considered mild injuries, and people usually fully recover from this condition. ...


Read More...

Failure to Thrive

A child whose height and weight does not fall within the normal limits of children of comparable age and gender is diagnosed with failure to thrive. There may a great many causes for this condition, ranging from genetic defects to disease conditions to environmental inadequacies. Any child who fails to thrive needs to be thoroughly examined physically and if necessary, the home environment may be investigated and evaluated. ...


Read More...

Immunizations

While infants are protected from certain diseases at birth because of antibodies passed on to them from the mother, this maternal protection is only temporary. Continuing immunity against many diseases can be achieved through vaccinations, most often administered as injections, but sometimes administered orally or nasally. Vaccinations use small amounts of killed or weakened microorganisms that cause the targeted diseases. Introducing these altered pathogens into the body assists the immune system in developing antibodies as if it were fighting off the actual disease. These antibodies provide the patient with long-term protection. ...


Read More...

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, sometimes referred to as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, is an autoimmune disorder that causes symptoms of arthritis in children. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis affects the lining of the joints and commonly affects children under the age of 16, causing pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints. Symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may come and go, and may last for a short time or for years. This condition may lead to growth problems and eye inflammation in some children. ...


Read More...

Lead Poisoning

Lead poisoning occurs when lead accumulates, often over a period of months or years, in the body. Lead poisoning can be very dangerous to children younger than 6; it can severely affect their mental and physical development. Children may be exposed to lead from lead-based paint that was used in older homes or buildings, or from contact with lead in the air, water, soil or food. Lead poisoning can lead to a variety of health problems in children and, in very high levels, can be fatal. It is recommended that children between the ages of 1 and 2 are tested for lead. ...


Read More...

Learning Disabilities

A learning disability, also referred to as a learning disorder, is a neurological disorder that prevents a child from learning, or significantly impairs the learning process. A learning disability is not a reflection of intelligence, and a child who has one may be of average or above-average intelligence. A child with a learning disability processes information differently from other children, and has difficulty performing specific tasks. A learning disability may affect attention span, coordination, the ability to understand or use spoken or written language or to perform math calculations. ...


Read More...

Ear Infections

Ear infections, also known as otitis media, are one of the most common childhood medical problems. Ear infections are the most frequent cause of doctor visits for children. In fact, three out of four children in the United States will have at least one ear infection by the time they reach the age of three. ...


Read More...

Newborn Screening

Shortly after birth, while still in the hospital, newborn infants are screened for serious genetic and medical conditions. Newborn screening is intended to identify children at increased risk for selected genetic, infectious, or other congenital disorders at the earliest stages. Newborn screenings allow doctors to educate families and ensure that babies with abnormal test results receive additional testing and treatment. With early diagnosis, treatment can begin right away, before serious problems occur or lifelong health problems begin. ...


Read More...

School Physicals

Every student should have an annual physical examination before going back to school to begin the new term. In many states, this medical examination is mandated by law and most schools require that a medical form be filled out before the child is permitted to attend classes. This checkup is necessary for the child's health and well-being and for the health of everyone else in the school environment. A typical physical examination includes the taking of a medical history, an observation and evaluation of posture, stature, mobility, joints and organs, as well as tests for vision and hearing. In many elementary schools, a school physician is available to perform medical examinations, but most students are examined by their private physicians. ...


Read More...

Strep Throat

Strep throat is a bacterial infection of the throat caused by the group A Streptococcus bacteria. This condition is highly contagious and may be spread easily from person to person, especially among family members, in schools and in child care settings. Children between the ages of 5 and 15 years old are commonly affected, however, strep throat can affect people of all ages. Strep throat is commonly treated with antibiotics, but left untreated it may lead to serious complications such as kidney inflammation or rheumatic fever.

...


Read More...

Developmental Screening

A developmental screening is a routine monitoring process used to identify any potential developmental delays in children. Early detection is a valuable tool in terms of treating health and development issues. Developmental screenings can help to identify delays in mental or physical abilities that may indicate a diagnosis of autism, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and other developmental or physical disabilities. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children be screened for general development at the ages of 9, 18, 24 and 30 months, or whenever a parent has a concern. ...


Read More...

Hives

Hives, also called urticaria, is a common skin condition in which swollen, pale red bumps, also known as welts or wheals, suddenly break out on the skin. Hives cause itching, stinging or burning and may appear anywhere on the body. Hives are most often an allergic reaction, but sometimes the allergen precipitating the adverse reaction is unknown. Hives is never a contagious condition. ...


Read More...

Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis, commonly referred to as pink eye, is an infection or inflammation of the conjunctiva, the membrane that lines the eyelid and covers the white part of the eyeball. The inflammation affects the blood vessels in the eye and gives the eye a pink or red appearance. Pink eye can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection, an allergic reaction, a foreign object in the eye or a blocked tear duct. Pink eye can be contagious, so proper diagnosis and prompt treatment are important. ...


Read More...

Influenza

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a contagious viral infection that appears seasonally. It spreads from person to person and can cause mild to severe symptoms. The flu affects the nose, throat and lungs and symptoms may include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, and fatigue. For some people, the flu can lead to serious complications, and possibly even death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), up to 20 percent of Americans gets the flu each year, and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized annually from flu-related complications. Young children, older adults and people with chronic diseases or weakened immune systems are at a higher risk for infection. ...


Read More...

Well Visit

A well visit, also known as a routine physical or medical checkup, is recommended for children of all ages. Regular well visit examinations are important for keeping children healthy and up-to-date on their immunizations. A well visit is also an opportunity to communicate with the doctor about growth and developmental issues and any concerns about a child's overall health. While they may be scheduled more frequently when they are younger, when a child reaches the age of 3, a well care visit should be scheduled annually with a pediatrician. Preventative care is an important part of a healthy lifestyle for a child. ...


Read More...

Flu Vaccination

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a contagious virus that appears seasonally. It spreads from person to person and can cause mild to severe illness. Symptoms of the flu include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills, and fatigue. For some people, the flu can lead to serious complications, and possibly even death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), up to 20 percent of Americans get the flu each year, and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized annually from flu-related complications. Flu season may start as early as October and usually subsides by May. ...


Read More...

HPV Vaccination

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted viral infection. There are more than 40 different kinds of HPV infections that can infect the genitalia, mouth and throats of men and women. In most cases, the immune system will fight the infection and it will go away on its own, causing no symptoms. In other cases, an HPV infection may lead to genital warts or cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina and anus. ...


Read More...

Athletic Stress

While physical exercise has proven to be a powerful tool in stress management, athletic endeavors can create stress of their own. A certain amount of stress is inherent in competitive sports, but managing athletic stress is necessary in maintaining physical and mental fitness. Stressors involved in athletic involvement include: ...


Read More...

Allergy Screening

Screening for allergies is necessary in order to identify the specific allergens that trigger reactions in sensitive individuals. By identifying the allergens, an allergy sufferer can avoid the offending substances as much as possible to reduce the frequency of episodic attacks, take medications to relieve symptoms, premedicate when exposure is likely, or undergo immunotherapy. Just as there are many types of allergic reactions, varying in symptoms and severity, there are many types of allergy tests. ...


Read More...

Appendicitis

Appendicitis is an inflammation of the appendix, a small finger-shaped organ that projects from the colon, on the right side of the body.

Causes of Appendicitis

The inflammation of the appendix is caused either by an obstruction or an infection. The inflammation causes bacteria within the appendix to multiply and the appendix to become swollen and filled with pus. Left untreated, the appendix may rupture. ...


Read More...

Asthma in Children

Asthma is one of the most common recurring childhood conditions and involves a temporary narrowing of the airways as a reaction to certain stimuli such as airborne pollen, a respiratory infection or cold weather. These narrowed airways result in difficulty breathing and wheezing.

It is important to develop an effective treatment plan for your child's condition based on their age and individual needs. Asthma treatment for children focuses on prevention and treatment. Prevention of an asthma attack may include the use of an inhaler, a home nebulizer machine, anti-inflammatory medication and bronchodilators. ...


Read More...

Bedwetting in Children

Bedwetting, also known as or nocturnal enuresis, refers to nighttime incontinence in children once they have been toilet-trained. Occasional bedwetting, especially in boys, is not uncommon up until the age of 7. After that time, medical consultation and treatment may be required. Bedwetting is more likely to occur in children who have a family history of the problem and in children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In the majority of cases, bedwetting simply indicates a slight delay in this particular area of development. ...


Read More...

Congenital Nevus

A congenital, or melanocytic, nevus is a mole that is present from birth or develops during the first year of life. Congenital nevi, typically dark in color and often hairy, can vary in size and shape and may enlarge as the child grows. Most congenital nevi are harmless, but should always be checked and monitored by a dermatologist because they have the potential to become malignant, and because patients with this type of mole are at increased risk for melanoma. Congenital nevi are categorized into three types: small, medium and giant. Small congenital nevi are quite common and rarely cause problems. Giant nevi, often referred to as bathing trunk nevi, may grow to eight inches in diameter. Giant nevi carry the most risk of cancer, with a one in six chance of becoming malignant. ...


Read More...

Blocked Tear Duct

A blocked tear duct is the result of a partial or complete obstruction of the tear drainage system. The tear duct, or nasolacrimal duct, drains tears away from the eye to the inside of the nose. When the duct cannot drain the tears, the tears collect in the eye causing an irritation. This condition affects almost 20 percent of newborn babies. ...


Read More...

Cold Sores

Cold sores, also known as fever blisters, are among the most common oral lesions, occurring on the lips or around the mouth. These sores, which are often painful, are caused by the herpes simplex virus. There are two types of herpes simplex virus, HSV-1 and HSV-2. Cold sores are usually caused by HSV-1, while HSV-2 is usually the cause of genital herpes. ...


Read More...

Constipation

Constipation affects almost everyone at some point. A person is considered constipated if he or she has three or fewer bowel movements a week, or has bowel movements that are hard, dry and/or painful. How often a bowel movement typically occurs determines whether a person is considered constipated. ...


Read More...

Constipation in Children

Constipation in children is common, although many parents never seek medical treatment for this condition. Constipation is defined as infrequent or hard bowel movements and may be the result of insufficient fluid consumption or a diet deficient in fiber. The frequency of bowel movements varies among individuals, so what is normal for one child may be abnormal for another. Generally speaking, if a child has three or fewer bowel movements per week or if stools are consistently hard, dry, and difficult to pass, the pediatrician should be consulted. ...


Read More...

Croup

Croup is the result of an inflammation of the upper airways, including the larynx, or voice box, the windpipe and throat. Often caused by a virus, croup can cause hoarseness in the voice and a barking cough. This condition occurs most often in infants and children under the age of five because their airways are small. In the United States, croup is most common in the fall and winter months between October and March. Although croup is not a serious condition, it can be troubling for both parent and child. ...


Read More...

Dehydration

Dehydration occurs when more fluid from the body is lost than absorbed. Dehydration leaves the body with insufficient water and fluids to carry out normal body functions. While dehydration can affect people of all ages, children, the elderly, and those suffering from chronic illnesses are especially susceptible to the effects of dehydration. Mild cases of dehydration can easily be remedied by drinking more fluids, but severe cases may require immediate medical attention. ...


Read More...

Depressive Disorders

Depression is a medical condition that causes extreme feelings of sadness and emptiness. People who suffer from depression may lose interest in activities they once enjoyed and experience a constant feeling of hopelessness on a daily basis. Depression, also known as clinical or major depression, may be triggered by certain events or occur along with other illnesses. Severe depression can interfere with a person's ability to work, sleep, eat, interact with others or enjoy life. With treatment, however, depression can become a manageable condition. ...


Read More...

Diarrhea

Diarrhea is a condition in which the patient passes loose, watery stool many times a day, often accompanied by a sense of urgency, cramps and stomach upset. Diarrhea can be brought on by bacteria, parasites, disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, medication or food intolerances. In most cases, diarrhea is not a long-lasting or serious condition. However, if it lasts for more than 3 days, is accompanied by a fever, severe abdominal pain or bloody stool, medical consultation is necessary. ...


Read More...

Diet and Exercise

Developing a healthy diet and regular exercise regimen are equally important. Many people only consider improving their diet and exercise routine when they want to lose weight. Diet and exercise, however, should not be forgotten once weight loss goals are achieved since they are important health factors even in individuals who are at an optimal weight. ...


Read More...

Childhood Diabetes

Diabetes is a serious, chronic metabolic disorder in which the body either does not produce enough insulin or does not respond to the insulin being produced. Diabetes affects an estimated 26 million children and adults in the United States which is over eight percent of the population. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, more than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes can lead to serious complications, it can often be successfully managed through dedicated, lifelong treatment. ...


Read More...

Eczema

Eczema is a common skin disorder that manifests itself as itchy skin and a red rash; it is particularly common in infants and young children. Eczema most often develops as a result of an allergic reaction, or an immune-system malfunction. It can cause irritation and inflammation anywhere on the body, but is especially prevalent on the face, the insides of the arms, and behind the knees. In infants with eczema, the scalp is frequently affected. ...


Read More...

Epilepsy in Children

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder caused by disturbances in brain activity, that results in recurrent seizures. Epileptic seizures can cause muscle spasms, convulsions and other troubling symptoms at any time. Epilepsy may develop as a result of abnormal brain wiring, an imbalance in nerve signals, or changes in brain cells. In many cases, the cause of epilepsy is unknown, however, it may be caused by genetics, head injury, tumor, certain diseases, or prenatal brain damage. Symptoms of epileptic seizures in children may vary and while seizures may be mild, all forms of epilepsy should be treated, as seizures may put children in danger during certain activities. ...


Read More...

Fifth Disease

Fifth disease, is a common childhood illness characterized by bright red cheeks. Fifth disease is an infection caused by the human parvovirus B19 and is also known as slapped cheek disease. The infection is spread through coughing and sneezing. It is a common illness in preschool and school-aged children but can be transmitted to adults. Fifth disease can lead to complications for pregnant women and those people with anemia or compromised immune systems. ...


Read More...

Frenectomy

A frenectomy is a relatively common type of oral surgery performed to remove the frenum (frenulum), the band of tissue that connects the tongue to the floor of the mouth. In some cases, abnormalities of the frenum, restrict movement of the tongue, interfering with a patient's ability to eat or speak. The speech problem, known medically as ankyloglossia, has given rise to the colloquial expression "tongue-tied." In cases where an abnormality of the frenum, such as size or tightness, is adversely affecting speech and eating patterns, a frenectomy is typically performed to remove the band of tissue causing the problem. ...


Read More...

Gastroenteritis

Gastroenteritis (stomach flu) is the inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. It is a very common ailment affecting approximately one in six people in the United States each year. Gastroenteritis may be caused by a virus, bacteria, a parasite, or by the ingestion of a drug or chemical toxin. Most forms of gastroenteritis are contagious, transmitted through contaminated water or food, or spread person-to-person. Although usually self-limited and not life-threatening, gastroenteritis can be dangerous to the very young, very old and immunocompromised. ...


Read More...

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Infants and Children

Causes of GERD

In infants, this condition may be a result of a poorly developed gastrointestinal tract. Older children may develop GERD from a relaxed lower esophageal sphincter, or LES, the same factor that causes the disease in adults. ...


Read More...

Migraines and Headaches in Children

While most people think that headaches are an adult condition, children experience them too. Headaches are as common for children as they are for adults. In fact, 20 percent of children, between the ages of 5 and 17, have headaches. About 15 percent of these headaches are tension related and the remaining 5 percent are migraine headaches. More prepubescent boys get headaches than girls. After puberty, more girls than boys get headaches. ...


Read More...

Pertussis Vaccination

Many diseases that caused serious illness and even death in the past are rare today because of routine immunizations. Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a potentially dangerous infection of the respiratory tract. It is extremely contagious and can produce a severe cough that can last for weeks and may make breathing difficult. Pertussis can lead to pneumonia and be fatal in some cases. ...


Read More...

Impetigo

Impetigo is a contagious bacterial skin infection frequently occurring in infants and young children. It is almost always caused by one of two types of bacteria: staphylococcus (staph) or streptococcus. Impetigo usually develops where the skin surface is compromised, enabling bacteria to invade. This may occur where the skin has a cut, scratch, bite or itchy rash. Impetigo often occurs at the end of a cold, when the skin around the nose or mouth is sore. The first signs of impetigo are the appearance of small itchy pimple-like sores. They may appear anywhere on the body, but most frequently occur on the face, arms, or legs. The sores eventually fill with honey-colored pus, break open after a few days and form a yellowish crust. The itchy sores can be spread by scratching to other parts of the body or from one person to another. ...


Read More...

Insect Bites and Stings

Reactions to insect bites and stings are usually in response to the venom that is received from the insect. While this may be a minor annoyance that heals within a few days for most people, there are some people who are severely allergic to the venom. People who are allergic to insect stings or bites may have a life-threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis which requires immediate medical attention. ...


Read More...

Kawasaki Disease

Kawasaki disease is a rare condition in children that causes the arterial walls, including those of the coronary arteries, to become inflamed. The disease is not contagious and cannot be prevented. Kawasaki disease mainly affects children younger than 5 years of age, and occurs more frequently in boys than girls. The disease is seen more in children of Japanese or Korean descent, but can occur in children of any racial or ethnic group. ...


Read More...

Lactation Consultation

Breastfeeding is a natural and healthy process that provides advantages to both baby and mother. Many new mothers have difficulty adjusting to breastfeeding, however, and may benefit from a lactation consultation. A lactation consultation can help the mother fully understand the breastfeeding process and troubleshoot any problems, pain or confusion she may have. ...


Read More...

Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is caused by a bacterium spread to humans by the bite of an infected black-legged tick. The tick becomes infected with the bacteria if it has bitten an infected mouse or deer. Humans are most frequently bitten by young ticks (nymphs) that are small and difficult to spot. Individuals who go to places where black-legged ticks are prevalent should take care to protect themselves. Most cases of Lyme disease can be effectively treated if diagnosed early, but left untreated can result in serious, life-altering symptoms. ...


Read More...

Milia

Known as baby acne, milia are small white bumps or cysts that appear on the skin. This condition most commonly affects newborn babies, although it can occur at any age. Milia are usually seen on the nose, chin or cheeks of a newborn. If milia appears on the inside of a newborn's mouth they are called Epstein's pearls. ...


Read More...

Molluscum Contagiosum Virus

Molluscum contagiosum virus, also known as MCV, is a viral skin infection, that causes small painless bumps on the skin. Skin bumps usually appear anywhere on the body two to seven weeks after exposure to infection, although in some patients it may take up to six months before symptoms are present. While it is more common in children, MCV can affect adults with a compromised immune system. Adults affected with MCV in the genital area are diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease. MCV can be spread through vaginal, anal or oral sex as a result of skin contact with an infected area. ...


Read More...

Mononucleosis

Mononucleosis, also known as mono or the kissing disease, is a viral infection transmitted through saliva. Mononucleosis may also be contracted by exposure to either a cough or sneeze or contact with contaminated surfaces.

Causes of Mononucleosis

Often found in teenagers between the ages of 15 and 17, mononucleosis is thought to be caused by the following: ...


Read More...

Nausea and Vomiting

Nausea and vomiting are uncomfortable symptoms that may or may not be indicative of a serious disorder. Nausea is a feeling of uneasiness in the stomach, usually accompanied by the sensation that one needs to, or is about to, vomit. Vomiting is the emptying, most often involuntarily, but occasionally voluntarily, of the stomach contents through the mouth. ...


Read More...

Nebulizer Treatment

A nebulizer is a breathing machine used to treat breathing problems such as those related to asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The nebulizer converts a liquid medication, usually a bronchodilator like albuterol, into a mist that can be easily and painlessly inhaled. A nebulizer is often used to make inhaling medicines easier for patients who may have difficulty breathing and using an inhaler. ...


Read More...

Nosebleeds

Nosebleeds, medically known as epistaxis, although a common occurrence, can be alarming. The great majority of nosebleeds, however, are not cause for serious concern. Most people experience one or more nosebleeds during their lifetime, usually during cold, dry weather. While nosebleeds can occur in a person of any age, they most frequently occur in young children and older adults. If an individual has frequent nosebleeds, however, or if a nosebleed is severe, the patient should be examined by a physician to make sure the that there is not an underlying condition that requires medical attention. ...


Read More...

Nutrition

Proper diet is essential to maintaining good health. Keeping the body well-nourished and at a healthy weight has been proven to improve mood, quality of life and longevity. It may also go a long way in preventing or controlling many serious illnesses. Obesity, which has now reached epidemic proportions in the United States, and an enemy of good health, can be kept at bay through proper nutrition along with a program of healthy exercise. ...


Read More...

Obesity

Obesity is a chronic condition defined by an excess of body fat. Body fat has several important functions in the body, such as storing energy and providing insulation. Excess body fat, however, may interfere with an individual's health and well-being, particularly if a patient becomes morbidly obese. Not only does obesity interfere with everyday activities, it also increases the risk of developing serious medical conditions, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. Obesity is a serious health issue presently reaching epidemic proportions in society. It results in medical complications and early morbidity for a great many people. Other health conditions caused or exacerbated by obesity may include heart disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, high cholesterol and asthma. The good news is that obesity is a treatable ailment and that modern medicine provides more remedies for the condition than previously existed. ...


Read More...

Pharyngitis

Commonly known as a sore throat, pharyngitis is usually the result of a viral infection, such as the common cold, or a bacterial infection, most often Streptococcus. Pharyngitis is characterized by rawness, scratchiness, and often swelling in the throat, sometimes accompanied by painful swallowing. On occasion, pharyngitis may be caused by a fungal infection or be a symptom of other diseases. Although usually not serious, pharyngitis that is accompanied by a fever, swollen lymph nodes, a rash, body aches or breathing difficulties should be diagnosed by a physician. Sometimes when a patient has pharyngitis, the tonsils or adenoids are also inflamed. ...


Read More...

Pityriasis Rosea

Pityriasis rosea is a common rash that usually begins with a rather large, often scaly patch, known as a herald patch, on the chest, back or abdomen. Although the rash spreads within hours or days of appearing, it is normally confined to the trunk of the body and the legs and does not affect the face, hands or feet. Most often, patients who develop this condition are between the ages of 10 and 35. The condition is not usually serious nor contagious and usually resolves on its own within 6 to 8 weeks. ...


Read More...

Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are noncancerous growths that develop on the soles of the feet. Caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), plantar warts are frequently found on the heels or balls of the feet, areas to which the most pressure is applied during standing or walking. While plantar warts are not a serious health threat, they may cause pain or tenderness and therefore need to be removed. ...


Read More...

Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an infection of one or both lungs that may be caused by bacteria, a virus or fungus. As a result, the lungs fill with pus or fluid causing difficulty breathing that may be accompanied by fever and chills. It can affect people of all ages but those at a higher risk of developing pneumonia include adults age 65 and older, children age 2 and younger, people with chronic illnesses or compromised immune systems, and smokers. Pneumonia can range in severity from mild to life-threatening. ...


Read More...

Poison Ivy

Poison ivy is a common plant known to cause allergic reactions in a large percentage of people. These allergic reactions usually manifest as unsightly and uncomfortable rashes on the skin. Skin rashes from poison ivy, like those from poison oak and poison sumac, are precipitated by an oily substance called urushiol found in the leaves, stems and roots of the plant. Poison ivy is found growing all over the continental United States, so rashes from poison ivy are very common. ...


Read More...

Precocious Puberty

Puberty is the period when a young person begins the process of sexual maturation that will result in the ability to reproduce. Puberty involves accelerated growth and the development of secondary sexual characteristics. These bodily changes occur at various ages, usually between 9 and 14 years of age for girls and 12 and 16 years of age for boys, and are associated with psychological changes as well. Precocious puberty occurs when the process of sexual maturation begins at an abnormally young age. ...


Read More...

Pruritus

Pruritus, or itching, is a tingling, irritating sensation on the surface of the skin that provokes scratching. While incidental itching may be resolved by scratching, persistent itching is often only worsened by this response. Itching may be confined to one area on the body or may be an encompassing condition. When confined to a specific area, itching is usually the result of a localized contact with an irritant. When it involves the whole body, it is more likely the result of a systemic disorder and may require a medical diagnosis through blood tests or skin biopsy. Severe itching is experienced as akin to pain. ...


Read More...

Ringworm

Ringworm is a contagious infection of the skin caused by a fungus called tinea, not a worm as one might infer from its name. Ringworm presents as itchy, scaly, ring-shaped red patches on the skin, bald spots in the hair or beard, or discolored, thickened nails. The most commonly infected areas of skin are on the scalp (tinea capitis), beard (tinea barbae), body (tinea corporis), groin (tinea cruris, jock itch or diaper rash) or foot (tinea pedis or athlete's foot). Ringworm tends to occur in warm, moist areas of the body, and can be passed by touching the skin of an infected person or by making contact with an contaminated item, such as a towel, hairbrush, or pool or shower surface. Pets, especially cats, can also transmit the fungus. Skin that is wet from sweat or the environment, or that is compromised by a minor injury, is more susceptible to an invasion of ringworm fungus. ...


Read More...

Scabies

Scabies is a skin condition caused by a mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) that burrows into the skin, causing itchiness in the affected area. The itching is the result of the body's allergic reaction to the mite, its eggs and its waste products.

This condition is highly contagious, spreading quickly through physical contact, and contact with personal belongings such as sheets and towels. Because of the contagion factor, an entire family or contact area (a classroom or a section of a nursing home) is often treated to prevent recontamination. Scabies can affect anyone, and at any age. Cleanliness, or lack of it, is not a factor in its transmission. ...


Read More...

Scarlet Fever

Scarlet fever, also known as scarlatina, is a bacterial infection caused by the group A Streptococcus bacteria. Scarlet fever occurs in a small amount of people who have strep throat and most often in children aged 5 to 15 years old.

Symptoms of Scarlet Fever

In addition to the symptoms of strep throat, scarlet fever may have some of the following symptoms: ...


Read More...

Sleep Disorders in Children

Many children suffer from sleep disorders that prevent them from getting a sufficient amount of sleep. Sleep disorders and insufficient amounts of sleep in children, can affect brain development, cause behavioral problems, and impact the overall quality of life for children and their families. Sleep problems can also cause anxiety and depression in children. In some cases, sleep deprived children may show hyperactive or inattentive behavior during the day, instead of tiredness. These children are sometimes misdiagnosed and treated for attention deficit hyperactive disorders, when the actual problem is a sleep disorder. ...


Read More...

Stuttering

Stuttering, or stammering, is a complex, multidimensional speech disorder that affects nearly four million people in the United States. Stuttering occurs most commonly in children, between the ages of 2 and 6, as their language skills begin to develop. Approximately five percent of all children will stutter at some point in their lives. Stuttering affects three times as many boys as girls and they are more likely to continue to stutter as they age. Over the course of time, 70 to 80 percent of children who stutter will outgrow stuttering. Less than one percent of adults in the United States stutter. ...


Read More...

Swimmer's Ear

Swimmer's ear (otitis externa) is an ear infection caused when bacteria found in water penetrates the ear canal. Occasionally, fungi or viruses may also cause this condition. Swimmer's ear usually only affects one ear and is most common among children, young adults and people who suffer from chronic middle ear infections. ...


Read More...

Tear Duct Obstruction

A tear duct obstruction, also known as dacryostenosis or nasolacrimal duct obstruction, is a common condition that affects more than five percent of all infants and is present at birth. Tears usually drain through small openings in the corners of the eyelids, known as puncta, and enter the nose through the nasolacrimal duct. When an obstruction exists, tears cannot properly drain from the eyes and may well up on the surface of the eye and overflow on the eyelashes and eyelids. The eyelids may also become red and swollen with yellow or green discharge. ...


Read More...

Teething

Teething is a milestone in a child's development, but a troubling time for both babies and parents. As the first teeth emerge, babies may experience pain and swelling of the gums. The first set of teeth, the central incisors, either upper or lower, usually appear between the ages of 4 and 7 months. The teething process can last until the child reaches 3 years of age. ...


Read More...

Tension Headache

A tension headache is the most common type of headache that affects people of all ages but typically affect adults and adolescents.

Causes of Tension Headaches

Tension headaches occur due to the contraction of the muscles in the neck and scalp. These contractions may be due to the following: ...


Read More...

Thrush

Thrush is a yeast infection of the mucous membranes that line the mouth and the tongue. Thrush is a common condition that is seen in babies and older adults as a result of a weakened immune system.

Causes of Thrush

Thrush, also referred to as Candidiasis, occurs when there is an imbalance of the body's immune system causing an excessive amount of Candida albicans yeast to develop in the mouth or throat. ...


Read More...

Tic Disorders

Tic disorders are neurological conditions that involve sudden involuntary movements or bursts of sound. These disorders normally show up in childhood and may be worsened by stress, anxiety, overheating or fatigue. The specific cause of tics is unknown, although it is believed to be neurological and may have a genetic component. Common tics include: ...


Read More...

Tonsils and Adenoids

The tonsils are two masses of tissue found on either side of the back of the throat. The adenoids are located behind the nose and high in the roof of the mouth. Together they form part of the lymphatic tissue at the back of the throat. They are an integral part of our immune system that protects the upper respiratory tract and prevents disease. The tonsils and adenoids assist the body in defense against infection by "sampling" entering bacteria and viruses and becoming infected themselves. They then help form antibodies to resist and fight future infections. ...


Read More...

Travel Medicine

Now that worldwide travel has become so common, for business, pleasure and educational purposes, travel medicine is an expanding field. In order to accommodate individuals or groups planning to travel to exotic locations, many services, including immunizations and prescribed medications, are available to prevent or treat diseases that may be prevalent abroad, or even, in some cases, in particular regions of the United States. The risk to travelers is increased if they are visiting a destination where they will come into contact with pathogens they have never before encountered. ...


Read More...

Traveler's Diarrhea

Traveler's diarrhea, which may have a number of different causes, can make international travel, particularly to certain parts of the world, as daunting as it is exciting. Some foreign destinations present health issues not commonly faced in the United States. Since traveler's diarrhea is the most common medical complaint of those who venture abroad, wise travelers take precautions. ...


Read More...

Warts

Warts are a common skin condition resulting from infection by one or another strain of human papillomavirus (HPV). There are several types of warts that can affect individuals of any age, but some types are more commonly found in children and some more often found in adults. Many types of warts, especially those usually found on children, disappear on their own. When troublesome, warts can be treated with medications or otherwise removed. ...


Read More...

Wheezing

Wheezing is a high-pitched, whistling sound that is made while breathing, and is often a symptom of a chronic respiratory condition. Wheezing is commonly caused by a narrowing of the airways that restricts the movement of air when breathing. This narrowing of the airways may be the result of an inflammation caused by asthma, a viral or bacterial infection, or an allergic reaction. It may also be caused by an obstruction of the airway caused by a tumor or an object that may have been inhaled. ...


Read More...


Back to top